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Elite Racewalking vs. Freestyle Fastwalking
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 17 October 2009 17:20

For most people, walking 5 miles per hour (a 12-minute mile) is a sensible target with good health benefits. Most people can walk 4 miles per hour (a 15-minute mile), so why not train for better skill and efficiency to accomplish the faster speed? You're not setting any records other than your personal best, so why not enjoy walking fast? Let's call this fastwalking.

A highly competitive level walking exists for those who like track & field events. It's called racewalking, and it's strictly regulated for style. In fact, you can get thrown out of a judged walk race for pedestrian walking. A footstep must land on the heel with a straightened leg. Top racewalkers can walk 8 miles per hour (a 7.5-minute mile) with proper form.

For most walkers, it is sufficient that they keep one foot on the ground at all times, without bothering unduly about the "bent knee" rule. Let those who are walking with less than perfect form be called freestyle fastwalkers. And let those who aim for a pace of 6 miles per hour or better (10-minute miles) with "legal" form be called elite racewalkers.

Road race officials probably encounter controversy in the walking division from time to time. Without trained racewalk judges, they would probably do well to advertise the walking division as freestyle fastwalking - simply keep one foot on the ground at all times, and use the honor system.


~ Charlie Duane

Last Updated on Saturday, 17 October 2009 17:28
 
Short Walks on a Long Weekend
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 21 July 2009 12:30

Cryptic notes in homage to Matsuo Bashō (link to article) along with photos.

All-day drive to Maine on Friday. Neighbor Meg brings new puppy Belle to play with Rocky and Serena at Orbeton Stream. Overflowed banks show signs of two weeks' rain. Thunder on return to car. At the spring, two drenching minutes with flashes of lightning... forget the water. At the store, Rocky leans on the car horn, amusing cyclists.

Saturday, we must walk to the rock. A solid new gate prevents ATV travel. Unleashed puppies love the tracks of moose and bear. After several years, signs of logging vanish. Already the road narrows to a trail in places. Forty feet of growth now obscure the views of Saddleback and Abraham.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 July 2009 19:32
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Discredited Theory of Illness II - Duane
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 12 July 2009 00:00

This 2-part article describes a "last resort" strategy for improving a compromised immune system. The recommendation: an hour's daily walk can be healthy for you - the exercise and change of scenery may promote your health in unseen ways. For competent medical advice, please consult a physician.

Part I of the article describes the role of "complete rest" in adapting to stress. Part II describes one potential toxicity in the built environment, an overload of electromagnetic radiation. Part I may be considered common ground, and Part II describes an argument that has been dimissed and discredited.

The human body has been designed to withstand all kinds of insults. In fact, it can be argued that various adversities and small injuries promote strong growth. So if we let alarms or phobias completely insulate us from the outside world, we will live in a bubble, weaken our immune system, and actually become more susceptible to disease.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 May 2009 14:10
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Discredited Theory of Illness I - Duane
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 12 June 2009 00:00

This 2-part article describes a "last resort" strategy for improving a compromised immune system. The recommendation: an hour's daily walk can be healthy for you - the exercise and change of scenery may promote your health in unseen ways. For competent medical advice, please consult a physician.

Part I of the article describes the role of "complete rest" in adapting to stress. Part II describes one potential toxicity in the built environment, an overload of electromagnetic radiation. Part I may be considered common ground, and Part II describes an argument that has been dimissed and discredited.

At one time in another century a person often worked to the point of physical collapse. A breakdown or nervous exhaustion forced a visit to the doctor's office. The doctor prescribed "complete rest," and the invalid would be sent on a forced vacation.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 June 2009 10:23
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